The Government of Kazakhstan knows my retirement account balance?

Nytimes_hq

The New York Times “Room for Debate” opinion pages recently asked Gregory Crawford, The President of Alliance Trust Company in Reno to comment on the Panama Papers and the advantages of and lawful usages of shell companies.  In this piece, Greg notes that the vast majority of these companies are used legally, providing a layer of security and privacy for international families in an increasingly dangerous world.

The interest of non-US citizens using foreign grantor trusts in Nevada is increasing dramatically.  Many countries are now recklessly sharing highly-sensitive and otherwise confidential individual financial information with rogue governments around the world under the OCED’s “Common Reporting Standards.” This program, which thankfully the United States is not participating in, gathers and automatically exchanges individual  names, addresses, tax identification numbers, and financial account balances with the governments of Azerbaijan, Cameroon, China, Georgia, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, the Philippines, Russia, Senegal, Tunisia, and Uganda, to name a few.  Where the information might go from there, no one knows.   Many of these countries have Horrific human rights records and serious corruption issues.  Automatically sharing this data will undoubtedly expose law-abiding individuals to the risk of extortion, kidnapping or worse.  The United States should remain proudly “non-compliant” with the CRS and its efforts to violate personal privacy.

it is worth noting that the State of Nevada offers excellent privacy provisions when establishing business entities such as LLCs, and there are options for the US and non-US citizens to keep their financial affairs private in trust.  Please contact Alliance Trust for more information at 775-297-4000.

 

Alliance Trust Company in The New York Times

Welcome-to-Nevada

Alliance Trust’s Greg Crawford appeared in the New York Times over the weekend, discussing the issue of “perpetual trusts.”  The link to the article is here.  Trust law in the United States evolved from England, which via case law established the “Rule Against Perpetuities” in 1682.  This law, refined by future cases,  effectively limited trust duration to approximately 90-100 years.  Recently, many states and foreign countries have either repealed the rule or have extended the duration of trusts far beyond the legal relic of the rule.  Nevada trusts can last for as long as 365 years.  In the NYT Greg discusses how a Nevada court would react to another court asserting jurisdiction over a Nevada trust, and how Nevada protects its trust and estates industry.  Alliance has worked for years with the legislature to enhance and protect what many consider to be the best trust laws in the country.  If you have questions as to how a Nevada trust could benefit you and your family for generations to come, call Greg Crawford in Reno at 775-297-4684.

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